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Posts Tagged ‘YA’

  1. Author Chris Struyk-Bonn, NICE GIRLS ENDURE

    October 20, 2016 by Kiersi

    Nice Girls Endure by Chris Struyk-BonnI was lucky enough to get to do an interview with Chris Struyk-Bonn, a friend of mine from my days among the Oregon chapter of SCBWI. I’ve always hugely admired Chris as a fellow writer and author, and so I’m thrilled to be able to interview her for my blog about her new book, NICE GIRLS ENDURE. (Look at that cover! Isn’t it perfect??)

    Nice Girls Endure

    by Chris Struyk-Bonn

    Category/Genre: YA Contemporary

    Released: August 1, 2016 (OUT NOW! Snag your own copy on Amazon!)

    Publisher: Switch Press

    Blurb: Chelsea Duvay is so many things. She’s an avid musical lover, she’s a gifted singer, and she has the most perfect, beautiful feet. But no one ever notices that. All they notice is Chelsea’s weight. (more…)


  2. Interview with Author Kate Brauning

    November 3, 2014 by Kiersi

    I’m so excited to have author Kate Brauning and her debut YA novel, HOW WE FALL, on the blog today! She’s got some really fun, exclusive content for us. (Scroll down for book blurb!)

    9781440581793cvr.indd

    I was lucky enough to get an ARC of HOW WE FALL, which I reviewed on Goodreads. It’s thrilling, emotional, fast-paced and un-put-downable. I may have cried a couple times.

    One thing that features prominently in the novel are classic movies, so I decided to ask Kate a couple questions about how they found their way into HOW WE FALL.

    1. How did you personally get into classic movies?

    When I was growing up, we frequently had family movie nights– something all seven of us could do together. But since my mother used to insist nothing good was made after 1960, that meant we watched a lot of classic movies. Musicals, especially. Men in suits, smoky bars, lavish parties with women in Grace Kelly gowns. Political intrigue, heady romance, subtle, character-driven stories. In some ways, I think it skewed my perception of adulthood, but I also learned to watch the stories carefully. (more…)


  3. COVER REVEAL: How We Fall

    May 12, 2014 by Kiersi

    You guys. YOU GUYS. I am so excited for this. I can’t tell you how excited I am to be one of the selected few to share the cover of this fantastic book with you.

    Kate Brauning has been a critique partner and friend for some time now, and when I found out the brief synopsis of her debut YA novel, How We Fall, I was like, “Yep, that’s our brave Kate for ya.” Really, she’s a fantastic writer, a kind friend and colleague, and a real classy lady.

    QUICK UPDATE: Kate’s also holding a contest on Facebook! Like her page and you could win one of two ARCs (advanced reader copies) of the book!

    So, here’s the low-down:

     

    HOW WE FALL by Kate Brauning

    YA contemporary

    Publication date: 11/3/2014

    Publisher: Merit Press, F+W Media Inc.

    ISBN-13: 9781440581793

    Hardcover, 304 pages

     

    About the Book:

    He kissed her on a dare. She told him to do it again. 

    Ever since Jackie moved to her uncle’s sleepy farming town, she’s been flirting—a bit too much—with her cousin, Marcus. She pushes away the inevitable consequences of their friendship until her best friend, Ellie, disappears, and the police suspect foul play. Just when she needs him most, Marcus falls for the new girl in town—forcing Jackie to give a name to the secret summer hours she’s spent with him. As she watches the mystery around Ellie’s disappearance start to break, Jackie has to face that she’s fallen in love at an impossible time with an impossible boy. And she can’t let Marcus, or Ellie, go.

     

    The Reveal!

    (more…)


  4. What Adult Books Can Teach Kidlit Writers

    April 21, 2014 by Kiersi

    Since I started writing YA books back in 2010, the space in my life for non-children’s books continues to shrink. I want to stay on top of my industry, to support the great literature being turned out by my contemporaries, and to learn and grow as a children’s book writer.

    So for a few years, I didn’t touch a book written for audiences over 21. I kept my head inside YA, and then MG (when I started branching out as a writer), and NA.

    Until recently. My book club picked up Margaret Atwood’s dystopian MaddAddam series (containing Oryx & Crake, The Year of the Flood, and MaddAddam), and boy, was it a learning experience. I think there’s a lot missing from the YA dystopian body of work, despite how saturated it is; very few of our YA dystopians even come close to highlighting in the same stark, frank detail the problems our society will inevitably face in the future as Atwood does. Even now that we’re on the tail end of the dystopian fad in YA, I still fail to see a single YA novel that addresses corporate gluttony and food scarcity (the inevitable future of our over-populated, capitalist society) with the same honesty as the MaddAddam series. (more…)


  5. Yes, There IS Still Sexism In Publishing

    May 7, 2013 by Kiersi

    Alter-cover by the fabulous Gillian Berry

    I’m shaking as I write this, because I’m both sad and angry. I guess in some parts of the world they call this “frustrated.” Or “sangry.”

    I’m sad that as a culture, we’re still divided this way: that some books are girly books, and some books are guy books.

    I’m also angry that people still try to pretend like it’s not a problem. That’s it’s not a problem we have to have separate “women-only” book awards, because female authors get so little recognition in mainstream awards (3:10 female to male winners for the Booker). That it’s no biggie when a female author gets slut-shamed while her books get ignored. Or that books by female authors tend to get fluffy, jazzy covers; that female authors have to use pen names to supposedly be marketable to boy audiences (J.K. Rowling?).

    Somehow, all this is not a “gendered” problem.

    Author Maureen Johnson did a pretty neat piece recently of books written by male authors, with the covers re-imagined as if the author was of the opposite sex or gender queer (also see the top image on this post). And boy, is it fascinating to look at. (more…)


  6. Tumblr and Your Social Media Strategy

    February 15, 2013 by Kiersi

    I’m disclaiming this post with one thing: I’m still new to Tumblr. I’m still building my base and learning the best practices. But here I want to talk basic and broad, and discuss A) why Tumblr is a great tool with which to build your social media strategy and author platform, and B) how to use it effectively without feeling like it’s a time-sink or “just one more thing to do.” Tumblr can be both fun, educational, and another way to get involved in your community and build an audience–particularly in the YA and MG writer communities. Guess who’s on Tumblr the most?

    Young adults and tweens. Your readers are right here, spending huge amounts of time on this new social media network (now that their parents are all on Facebook and it’s no longer a safe haven for them). So grab it by the horns.

    What is Tumblr?

    Think of Tumblr as Facebook meets blogging. You have a “Dashboard,” which is essentially a Facebook feed. You “follow” other Tumblrs, and their posts appear on your feed. You have a few options: (more…)


  7. Crown of Embers is a Worthy Sequel

    February 13, 2013 by Kiersi

    The Crown of Embers, by Rae Carson

    The Crown of Embers, by Rae Carson

    This series gets: ♥♥♥♥♥ out of 5

    The Crown of Embers, by Rae Carson – I need to just get something off my chest before we start this review: Rae Carson knows how to write. When she sits down at her keyboard, do birds start singing? Do little deer come out of the woods and press their shiny black noses to her window? Do squirrels knit her a new dress every morning out of moss and bramble?

    Anyway, my point is that The Crown of Embers is a very worthy follow-up to Girl of Fire and Thorns (I am shocked and a little horrified to not have reviewed it, but if you have not read it, simply be content to know it is amazing and that you should definitely read it). Elisa, our overweight princess from the previous novel, has trimmed down some through her adventures across the desert and, due to circumstances, is now queen of the realm. Not only that, but she’s developing some… feelings, for a particular captain of the guard. (more…)


  8. The Curse Workers Trilogy, by Holly Black

    January 24, 2013 by Kiersi


    Curse Workers (White Cat, Red Glove, Black Heart) by Holly Black

    This series gets: ♥♥♥♥ out of 5

    The Curse Workers, a trilogy by Holly Black – A preface note: I listened to all of these on audiobook, so any name misspellings are purely Holly’s fault for giving all of her characters homonyms for names (Cassel = Castle, Barron = Baron). For the longest time I was actually spelling “Cassel” as “Castle” in my head, and let me tell you, that is way more awesome.

    Anyhow, I loved Curse Workers. The idea is brilliant. Cassel Sharpe lives in an alternate Earth, where one in every one thousand people has a special ability–these “workers,” as they’re called, can place a curse with no more than the touch of a bare hand. Workers come in all kinds, from small-time luck workers (good or bad luck), to emotion or memory workers, to death workers who can kill just by removing a glove. (Like magic in most books, there are repercussions to “working,” called “blowback,” which is always related in some way to the type of curse-working. Oh, yeah. This is definitely my favorite alternate universe ever.)  (more…)


  9. The Princess Fantasy (or Delusion)

    January 21, 2013 by Kiersi

    The Princess Fantasy:
    Are Authors Responsible For The Messages They Send About Love and Life?

    What is “the princess fantasy”? 

    This opinion piece might be better titled, “the princess delusion,” because that’s really what it is that I want to talk about: a delusion. A notion that a girl is, above all else, destined to be with the perfect man; that there will be some magical spark when she meets him, that he will rescue her from everything that is wrong in her life, and they will instantly (usually on first sight) fall in love. Forever.

    The love interests in these “fantasies” are often alpha-males, or “princes,” who fulfill every desire (this is relative to the audience, of course). In young adult books, I find there are a few different kinds of princes to choose from: the bad boy, who is eventually reformed by the girl’s love (the “Beast”); the guy who is perfect from the start, loves the princess madly, and pursues her relentlessly, but has pretty disturbing or suspicious behaviors (the Edward Cullens of the group); the two-dimensional Prince Charming or Prince Philip; and a variety of other archetypes that are all, in some way, freakishly ideal. (more…)


  10. What Happens Next Stirs Things Up

    January 14, 2013 by Kiersi

    Cover of What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton

    What Happens Next, by Colleen Clayton

    This book gets: ♥♥♥♥♥ out of 5

    What Happens Next by Colleen Clayton – It’s really hard to write good contemporary YA–and it’s even harder for me to like it. I mean this in the kindest possible way. Especially when addressing the big issues like rape and eating disorders, it’s easy for authors to preach. It’s easy for their characters, as a result, to sound flat or forced; but Clayton effortlessly dodges the trap.

    Cassidy “Sid” Murphy is a straight-A cheerleader–until she meets a handsome stranger on a school ski trip. That night, Dax Windsor invites her inside, and afterwards, she can remember nothing; but she knows Dax has taken something from her. Something she can never get back. (more…)